Lesson
2

Yet in attachment blossoms fall...

2 of 2

Let's return to the apparent contradictions in Dogen's verse.

As all things are buddha-dharma, there is delusion and realization, practice, and birth and death, and there are buddhas and sentient beings.

As the myriad things are without an abiding self, there is no delusion, no realization, no buddha, no sentient being, no birth and death.

The buddha way is, basically, leaping clear of the many of the one; thus there are birth and death, delusion and realization, sentient beings and buddhas.    

Yet in attachment blossoms fall, and in aversion weeds spread.

So if you're listeing to this course so you can dot every i, try a different approach. You can look at things in a variety of ways, depending on the perspective you bring to your situation.

As all things are buddha-dharma, there is delusion and realization, practice, and birth and death, and there are buddhas and sentient beings.

If you come with the perspective of enlightenment, then maybe — from an enlightened perspective — all things are buddhadharma. As everything has Buddha nature, everything is just as it is, everything is particular.

Do you have concepts like birth and death, delusion and enlightenment... Do you apply these concepts? "That's being a buddha; that's being deluded..."


As the myriad things are without an abiding self, there is no delusion, no realization, no buddha, no sentient being, no birth and death.

As there’s no self, there’s no discrimination. There is no basis for making distinctions.

The buddha way is, basically, leaping clear of the many of the one; thus there are birth and death, delusion and realization, sentient beings and buddhas.    

As Buddhdharma is leaping clear of the one and the many, you can find the particular in the empty.

Yet in attachment blossoms fall, and in aversion weeds spread.

No matter what you think, no matter what perspective you bring, things happen — blossoms fall, weeds spread...

Do you find yourself considering which of these perspectives is "right"? Do you think they're a progression?

How might you practice with this?

In the sections of Genjo Koan that follow, Dogen looks at each of these in greater depth.